logo
Question of the Week
Video Library
Ophthalmology Books & Manuals
Cyber-Sight Atlas of Eye Diseases
The Ophthalmology Minute
Nursing Education
Eye Care Equipment
ORBIS Program Features
Free Online Journals
Ophthalmology Links
Ask a Professor
Print ViewPrint this Page
Answers: 2010 Series : September 14, 2010

December 28, 2010  |  December 21, 2010  |  December 14, 2010  |  December 7, 2010  |  November 30, 2010  |  November 23, 2010  |  November 16, 2010  |  November 9, 2010  |  November 2, 2010  |  October 26, 2010  |  October 19, 2010  |  October 12, 2010  |  October 5, 2010  |  September 28, 2010  |  September 21, 2010  |  September 14, 2010  |  September 7, 2010  |  August 31, 2010  |  August 24, 2010  |  August 17, 2010  |  August 10, 2010  |  August 3, 2010  |  July 27, 2010  |  July 20, 2010  |  July 13, 2010  |  July 6, 2010  |  June 29, 2010  |  June 22, 2010  |  June 15, 2010  |  June 8, 2010  |  June 1, 2010  |  May 25, 2010  |  May 18, 2010  |  May 11, 2010  |  May 4, 2010  |  April 27, 2010  |  April 20, 2010  |  April 13, 2010  |  April 6, 2010  |  March 30, 2010  |  March 23, 2010  |  March 16, 2010  |  March 9, 2010  |  March 2, 2010  |  February 23, 2010  |  February 16, 2010  |  February 9, 2010  |  February 2, 2010  |  January 26, 2010  |  January 19, 2010  |  January 12, 2010  |  January 5, 2010

To see views enlarged, click on the individual pictures...



This is a 5-month-old girl whose mother notices a swelling on the lateral side of the left eye at one month of age. The mother is concerned about the mass enlarging, but so far she states that it is remaining the same size. She also states that the eye has appeared red a few times. The child appears to see normally, refraction is +0.50 in each eye and the remainder of the examination is normal and there is no proptosis. The mass has a yellowish appearance.

1. What is the most likely diagnosis?

d -- dermolipoma

This is the typical appearance of a lipodermoid.


2. The diagnosis in this case is aided by:

d -- (a), (b), and (c).

The location, color, and lack of increase in size contribute to the diagnosis.


3. The best management is:

a -- simply observing

In a case like this the patient should be simply observed.

Dermolipoma is classified as a choristoma.  It has little potential for growth. It is made up of displaced rests of epithelial and dermal tissue. Dermolipomas are a variant of dermoid cysts and are found typically at the temporal aspect of the globe as seen in this patient. These lesions differ from the typical dermoid cyst in that they have adipose tissue in them.

It is best to simply observe this patient and watch for growth. It probably will not grow. Surgery should be AVOIDED unless absolutely necessary. If surgery is done it should be done very carefully while avoiding going into the orbit. Going into the orbit in an attempt to remove a dermolipoma can result in restrictive strabismus. 

 

footer logo