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2010 Series -  September 7, 2010 Lecture 17 of 52  NEXT»

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This one-month-old infant was born with bilateral corneal opacities that are close to the visual axis and synechiae between the iris and lens in both eyes. A TORCH (Toxoplasmosis, Rubella, Cytomegalo virus, Herpes) screening was done. Testing for IgG was positive for herpes simplex and rubella virus. White blood cell count was 13.83 (normal 9.00 to 12.00) with 67% lymphocytes. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was normal. The fundus appears normal, but the pupil dilates poorly because of the synechiae, and the intraocular pressure was 13 mmHg in both eyes.

1. The clinical picture and findings are compatible with:

a. intrauterine infection
b. herpes or rubella virus as the cause
c. a concern for development of vision
d. this being an unusual and challenging case
e. all of the above

2. A concern to be dealt with very soon is:

a. glaucoma
b. occult retinitis
c. the possibility of ptosis
d. amblyopia
e. none of the above

3. Another condition to be ruled out is:
a. bilateral Peterís anomaly
b. Moebius
c. varicella infection
d. Morgan syndrome
e. none of the above

For answers to the above, click here on or after September 14, 2010.

 

 


Lecture 17 of 52 «Previous Lecture   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52    Next»
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